August 2019
Services
4th 10:30am When you pray - All must be forgiven Matthew 6:12
6:00pm Beginning with - Paul Acts 9:4 (C)
11th 10:30am When you pray - Deliverance Matthew 6:13 (C)
6:00pm A new beginning Revelation 21:1
18th 10:30am Rev Stephen Price and Ewan Thompson    
6:00pm Rev Stephen Price and Ewan Thompson    
24th 10:30am Rev Anne Roberts  
6:00pm Dilwyn Biles  
 
       
(C) denotes communion will be held as part of the worship service

Weekday Meetings - there are no weekday meetings this month
Monday Craft Group Restarts 9th September
Wednesday Luncheon Club Restarts 4th September
Bible Study Restarts 4th September
Thursday Mums and Toddlers Restarts 5th September
Ladies' Meeting Restarts

12th September

Bible Study Restarts 5th September
       
       
       

Gardener's Corner    

August is upon us once again, holiday time and time to relax in your garden and enjoy all the earlier work you put in. Fuchsias, trailing pelargoniums, lobelias, petunias, and foliage plants all looking their best just now. Hanging baskets, tubs and borders all full of colour.
Plums starting to ripen now, after a wealth of berries of all sorts which just keep on coming - a wonderful time for summer fruits of all varieties. Time to prune wisterias if you have one, get rid of those long spindly shoots, cut back to 3 or 4 buds for flowering next year.
A busy time with lawns and hedges of course, as they just keep on growing! Phlox & hydrangeas are now looking their best with a great choice of colours these days. Tomatoes are beginning to ripen too. It's also a good time to start collecting seeds or taking cuttings for next year.
Sit back and enjoy your gardens!


Minister's Musings
They've gone and changed the Lectionary. Until recently the Feast of the Transfiguration was celebrated on August 6th - as decreed long ago by Pope Callixstus III. In 1945, that was also the day that an atomic bomb was first used in anger - dropped on Hiroshima to hasten the end of WWII. This was a gift for Christian supporters of CND, as the contrast was made between the coming to earth of the Son and the sun. Perhaps that is why the date has been changed in the Lectionary to the last Sunday before Lent. Or perhaps it was seen as more fitting to remind the Church of Christ in all his glory as we prepare to enter the time of penitence that leads to the degradation of the Son of Man on the cross at Good Friday.
For the disciples who were there, the Transfiguration of Jesus was literally a mountain top experience. They had been expecting to spend a quiet time with Jesus in prayer - after all, it was his habit to withdraw for a while from the rush of his daily life, and occasionally he would take disciples with him. But things did not turn out as expected. Suddenly their friend had changed, standing before them in glory and shining like the sun. Beside him were Moses and Elijah, and voice from heaven rang in their ears - This is my beloved Son - listen to him.
And Jesus said that they must go back down the mountain. This was not what they wanted to hear. They knew what was down there, and they wanted to stay where they had experienced so much. But down they went, back into the chaos; where the crowds clamoured for their attention and they were often left feeling out of their depth. It would have been so much better to stay on the mountain top.
What they felt is not uncommon. We would all rather stay with those mountain top experiences - moments of great insight, visions of wonder, times of triumph, holidays where can just get away from it all. But our ordinary lives are always there, waiting for us to return - back to the mundane, the routine, the same old same old. Yet it is not the same. When the disciples went back down from the mountain, Jesus was still with them - but he was not the same Jesus. They had seen beyond the ordinary, and begun to come to terms with who their friend really was. And when we return to our routine, it is not the same routine. We have caught a glimpse of something special in the world. And it is in the world even when we cannot see it, which makes us look at the world differently.
And slowly we begin to see the world as the disciples saw it, as world filled with the glory of God because Jesus is with us as he was with them - a truth we need to know, whatever the date fixed for the Feast of the Transfiguration.

 

   

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